Roman News and Archeology

Roman archeology related news

Lead poisoning in ancient Rome →

Supply became contaminated as it passed through giant network of lead pipes that distributed water around city, scientists believe.

ap water in ancient Rome, provided by its famous aqueducts, was contaminated with up to 100 times more lead than local spring water, researchers say.

Huge volumes of fresh water flowed along aqueducts to the heart of the Roman empire but the supply was contaminated as it passed through the giant network of lead pipes that distributed water around the city.

Researchers in France said levels of lead in Roman drinking water were a concern, but were probably insufficient to cause widespread mental problems, or potentially drive up crime rates, through lead poisoning.

— 1 day ago
Ancient Rome was bigger than previously thought →

British scientists have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the river port of ancient Rome which they say proves that the city was much larger than previously estimated.

Researchers from the universities of Southampton and Cambridge uncovered the extra section of the wall at Ostia while conducting a survey of an area between the port and another Roman port called Portus - both of which are about 30 miles from the Italian capital.

Scholars had thought the Tiber formed the northern edge of Ostia, but this new research, using geophysical survey techniques to examine the site, has shown that Ostia’s city wall continued on the other side of the river.

— 1 week ago
Roman Port Facilities Emerge Under Archaeological Investigation →

Known as Vada Volaterrana, it has been identified as a key port system located in present-day Tuscany, Italy, used anciently by the Romans of the city of Volaterrae (today’s Volterra) for the import and export of trade goods throughout the Mediterranean.

The main harbor was located north of the mouth of the Cecina river, at S. Gaetano di Vada. Here, the University of Pisa has been excavating, since the 1980s, a significant commercial quarter that has yielded major structures and numerous artifacts that have testified to a facility built during the Augustan age but lasting through to the sixth-seventh centuries, C.E.

Currently led by Simonetta Menchelli of the Laboratory of Ancient Topography of the University of Pisa and Stephano Genovesi of the Archaeological Superintendences of Tuscany, Liguria and Sardinia, the team has uncovered two thermal baths, a large warehouse (horreum) with about 36 cells, a large water tank, a monumental fountain, and a building with three large apses, decorated with remarkable wall paintings and surrounding an open squared courtyard.

— 1 week ago
Leicester dig unearths Iron Age mint and Roman tile with dog paw prints | Leicester Mercury →

Archaeologists believe they might have stumbled across an Iron Age mint which produced gold and silver coins for the coveted Hallaton Treasure.

The dig at Blackfriars, in the city, unearthed coin mould fragments which, combined with evidence from previous excavations, seems to confirm the site was a 2,000-year-old Corieltauvi tribe mint.

The Corieltauvi controlled most of the East Midlands, with Leicester as its capital.

Archaeologists believe the Blackfriars site could have produced some of the 5,000 silver and gold coins found in 2000, near the Leicestershire village of Hallaton.

Senior project manager Nick Daffern said: “We’ve got over 20 coin moulds, which at an urban site like this is quite significant – a lot of them would have been damaged over time.

"This is an exciting find and gives us an idea of where some of the Hallaton Treasure actually comes from."

The team also found a Roman tile in the northern half of the site, with what appear to be dog paw imprints embedded in the ceramic.

— 1 week ago
Roman Byzantine monastery and mosaic floor discovered →

An impressive monastery and mosaic dating to the Roman Byzantine period was discovered at the entrance to Hura in the northern Negev during the course of an IAA salvage excavation for the purpose of building a highway interchange.

The structure, measuring 20 × 35 meters, is divided into halls built along an east–west axis, the most outstanding of which are the prayer hall and dining room due to the breathtaking mosaic carpets revealed in them.

The prayer hall is paved with a mosaic on which a pattern of leaves is vibrantly portrayed in blue, red, yellow and green colors. The dining room floor is a colorful mosaic pavement depicting floral motifs, geometric decorations, amphorae, baskets and even a pair of birds.

According to Daniel Varga, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, “It seems that this monastery, located near the Byzantine settlement of Horbat Hur, is one monastery in a series of monasteries situated alongside a road that linked Transjordan with the Be’er Sheva‘ Valley”.

The mosaic carpets also include four Greek dedicatory inscriptions denoting the names of the monastery’s abbots: Eliyahu, Nonus, Solomon and Ilrion, and the dates when the pavements were constructed in the different halls. These inscriptions also aided archaeologists in dating the monastery to the second half of the sixth century CE.

— 2 weeks ago
Unearthing a Roman fort and settlement at Maryport →

An archaeological team is unearthing the remains of a Roman fort and settlement in the hope of gaining a better understanding of everyday Roman civilian life.

Oxford Archaeology (OA) and a team of volunteers are excavating an extramural settlement at Maryport Roman fort on the west coast of Cumbria.

Built high on the cliffs overlooking Solway Firth, it is believed the fort was founded in the First Century AD when the Roman army initially entered the region.

Now, a project is being undertaken to explore part of the fort’s civilian settlement to “build up a picture” of what ordinary life was like.

Believed to be founded before 120 AD during the reign of Emperor Hadrian, historians say the stone fort was an “integral part” in coastal defences extending down the Cumbrian coast from Hadrian’s Wall.

The civilian settlement, which lies north-east of the fort, is believed to be the largest currently known along the Hadrian’s Wall frontier.

— 2 weeks ago
Beachy Head Lady was young sub-Saharan Roman with good teeth →

“We had over 300 different individuals – most skeletons, but some cremations. The idea was to go back through all those. We had some information about some of them but others we had nothing on.

They were held in the basement of the town hall, where I keep my archaeology collection. They came primarily from two main Saxon cemeteries that were excavated – one in particular had over 200 graves.

During that process we came across two boxes which said ‘Beachy Head, something to do with 1956 or 1959’, and that was about it.

— 3 weeks ago
BBC News - Maryport Roman settlement: Unearthing a Roman civilian's past →

An archaeological team is unearthing the remains of a Roman fort and settlement in the hope of gaining a better understanding of everyday Roman civilian life.

Oxford Archaeology (OA) and a team of volunteers are excavating an extramural settlement at Maryport Roman fort on the west coast of Cumbria.

Built high on the cliffs overlooking Solway Firth, it is believed the fort was founded in the First Century AD when the Roman army initially entered the region.

Now, a project is being undertaken to explore part of the fort’s civilian settlement to “build up a picture” of what ordinary life was like.

Believed to be founded before 120 AD during the reign of Emperor Hadrian, historians say the stone fort was an “integral part” in coastal defences extending down the Cumbrian coast from Hadrian’s Wall.

The civilian settlement, which lies north-east of the fort, is believed to be the largest currently known along the Hadrian’s Wall frontier.

— 4 weeks ago
Roman Emperor Dressed As Egyptian Pharaoh in Newfound Carving | LiveScience →

An ancient stone carving on the walls of an Egyptian temple depicts the Roman emperor Claudius dressed as an Egyptian pharaoh, wearing an elaborate crown, a team of researchers has discovered.

In the carving, Emperor Claudius, who reigned from A.D. 41 to 54, is shown erecting a giant pole with a lunar crescent at the top. Eight men, each wearing two feathers, are shown climbing the supporting poles, with their legs dangling in midair.

Egyptian hieroglyphs in the carving call Claudius the “Son of Ra, Lord of the Crowns,” and say he is “King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Lord of the Two Lands.” The hieroglyphs say he is raising the pole of the tent (or cult chapel) of Min (an ancient Egyptian god of fertility and power) and notes a date indicating a ritual like this took place around the summertime researchers say. It would have taken place even though Claudius never visited Egypt. A cult chapel is a place of worship and a tent could also be used for this purpose.

— 1 month ago
Roman Shipwrecks Lost to Time →

National Geographic

Published March 24, 2014

Finding modern ships lost at sea, even with the help of radar, sonar, and satellites, can be a herculean task. But trying to find a shipwreck from thousands of years ago is even harder. It’s like looking for a wooden needle in a haystack after part of the needle has rotted away.

Underwater archaeologists keep looking, though, because finding one of these shipwrecks could yield a treasure trove of information—from how ancient peoples built their vessels to where they traveled and who their trading partners were.

Figuring out those connections would allow researchers to better understand ancient economies, and to put the cultures into a more global context, says James Delgado, director of maritime heritage for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The main problem with finding ancient shipwrecks is that the vessels tend to be made mostly of wood, says Cemal Pulak, a nautical archaeologist at Texas A&M University in College Station. And submerged wood doesn’t fare well in the ocean because of an animal called a shipworm.

— 1 month ago
Making Garum at Home →

Charlie Mecklenburgh makes Garum at home. She is currently assisting with the on-going excavation and preservation of Ice Age fossil deposits at the La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California.

— 1 month ago
Cambridge University archaeologists find 'oldest' Roman irrigation system →

Excavations at a Cambridge University development have revealed what archaeologists believe is Britain’s oldest-known Roman irrigation system.

Planting beds and pit wells were unearthed at the North West Cambridge site near Huntingdon Road.

Chris Evans from the university’s archaeological unit said they dated from between 70 AD and 120 AD.

It was an “unparalleled discovery” and “effectively the first irrigation system we’ve seen”, he said.

Excavations have so far uncovered evidence of settlements and habitation on the site from as early as the later Neolithic period, about 2800 BC to 2200 BC, to the Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman period as well as more modern finds including World War II practice trenches.

— 1 month ago with 1 note
Discover the ancient port of Rome with online learning

The University of Southampton has launched a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), giving people the opportunity to explore Portus, the ancient port of Rome.

‘Archaeology of Portus: Exploring the Lost Harbour of Ancient Rome’ will enable anyone to study online, for free, wherever they are in the world – while benefitting from the decades of research carried out by the University’s Portus Project at this historic site located around 20 miles from Italy’s capital city. The MOOC requires no previous experience, there is no admission interview and no need to have ever studied online or even in higher education.
Discover Portus

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/03/2014/discover-the-ancient-port-of-rome-with-online-learning

— 1 month ago
This site has been transfered

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this site has been transfered to http://www.romanarcheology.com/

You will find all past and present news from Roman Archeology.

See you soon there! http://dlvr.it/38XV70 #archaeology #rome

— 1 year ago with 1 note
Massilia — Ancient History Encyclopedia

Along the north-western coast of the Mediterranean Sea between Spain and Italy lies the ancient city of Massilia (modern Marseilles). Originally founded in 600 BCE by Ionian Greeks from Phocaea…

Read more http://dlvr.it/3327mN #archaeology #rome

— 1 year ago