Roman News and Archeology

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L’histoire romaine sera-t-elle réécrite en Angleterre?

L’histoire romaine sera-t-elle réécrite en Angleterre?

roman history

L’empire Romain dans les iles britanniques

L’histoire romaine ne sera peut être plus tout à fait celle que l’on connait…

Une nouvelle découverte archéologique sur le site des Durotriges dans le Dorset pourrait aider à faire la lumière sur l’élite rurale de la Grande-Bretagne romaine.

Les ossements trouvés sont uniques car ils ont été enterrés à proximité d’une villa romaine, ce qui rend probable…

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— 2 months ago with 1 note
Five skeletons that could change view of Roman history →

A new archaeological find uncovered at the Durotriges site in Dorset could help to shed light on the rural elite of late-Roman Britain.

The skeletal remains are thought to be unique as they are buried near a Roman villa, making it likely that the skeletons belonged to the owners and occupants of the villa – the first time in Britain that the graves of villa owners have been found in such close proximity to the villa itself.

Five skeletons were found; two adult males, two adult females and an elderly female – with researchers postulating that they could be the remains of three generations of the same family, who all owned the villa. The bones are thought to date from the mid-4th Century (around 350 AD).

— 2 months ago with 2 notes
Ancient Roman Military Camp Unearthed

Ancient Roman Military Camp Unearthed

Roman Military Fort

This is an excerpt from: Ancient Roman Military Camp Unearthed in Eastern Germany:

Archaeologists have confirmed the presence of a long-lost Roman military camp deep in eastern Germany. The 18-hectare site, found near the town of Hachelbich in Thuringia, would have sheltered a Roman legion of up to 5000 troops. Its location in a broad valley with few impediments suggests it was a stopover on the…

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— 4 months ago with 1 note
Ancient Roman Military Camp Unearthed in Eastern Germany →

Archaeologists have confirmed the presence of a long-lost Roman military camp deep in eastern Germany. The 18-hectare site, found near the town of Hachelbich in Thuringia, would have sheltered a Roman legion of up to 5000 troops. Its location in a broad valley with few impediments suggests it was a stopover on the way to invade territory further east.

“People have been searching for evidence of the Romans in this part of Germany for 200 years,” says team leader Mario Kuessner, an archaeologist working for the state of Thuringia. “It took a long time before we realized what we had, and we wanted to be sure.”

After a stinging defeat in 9 C.E., Rome largely abandoned hope of conquering the fractious German tribes north of the Rhine River. Yet written sources suggest that the Romans occasionally campaigned in Germany, probably to punish German tribes for raids on Roman territory. Until recently, the reports have been largely dismissed as braggadocio. The Hachelbich site, along with a battlefield near Hannover uncovered in 2008, show that the reports had more than a kernel of truth to them—and that the Romans were willing to cross their frontier when it suited their political or military needs.

— 4 months ago
Les origines de Rome remontent encore plus loin dans le temps

Les origines de Rome remontent encore plus loin dans le temps

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ancient rome lapis niger

Lapis Niger

Ceci est la traduction de: Rome ‘ages’ 200 years as archaeologists discover new remains

Les origines de Rome remontent à 200 ans de plus que généralement admis. C’est du moins ce qu’affirment des archéologues lors de fouilles sur le forum de Rome.

Rome est déjà reconnue comme l’une des plus anciennes villes du monde – mais la Rome antique est devenue juste un peu plus vieille…

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— 4 months ago
Ancient Rome might be older than thought

Ancient Rome might be older than thought

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ancient rome lapis niger

This is an excerpt from: Rome ‘ages’ 200 years as archaeologists discover new remains:

It’s already known as one of the world’s oldest cities – but ancient Rome just got a little older.

Excavations inside the Roman Forum have found the remains of a wall dating back to 900 BC – suggesting that the Eternal City was settled two centuries earlier than previously believed.

Using the latest…

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— 4 months ago
Rome 'ages' 200 years as archaeologists discover new remains →

It’s already known as one of the world’s oldest cities – but ancient Rome just got a little older.

Excavations inside the Roman Forum have found the remains of a wall dating back to 900 BC – suggesting that the Eternal City was settled two centuries earlier than previously believed.

Using the latest technology, archeologists in Italy uncovered pieces of the wall made from tufa – a type of limestone – along with fragments of ceramics and grains, during excavation of the Lapis Niger, a black stone shrine that preceded the Roman Empire by several centuries.

— 5 months ago
Ancient bones show signs of struggle with coeliac disease →

If going gluten-free seems hard now, try doing it in ancient Rome. A well-heeled young woman with coeliac disease tried to adapt her diet in an unsuccessful effort to cope with gluten sensitivity, studies of her remains suggest.

The woman’s remains were buried in a 2,000-year-old tomb at the Cosa archaeological site on the Tuscan coast in Italy. The ancient Roman city’s economy depended on growing wheat and olives and was not particularly prosperous, yet archaeologists discovered gold and bronze jewellery entombed alongside the woman’s bones. They concluded that she was relatively wealthy and would have had access to plenty of food.

Yet the skeleton of the woman — who researchers estimate was 18–20 years old — bore signs of malnutrition and osteoporosis. Both can be complications of untreated coeliac disease, which is characterized by a severe allergic reaction to gluten in the intestinal lining. Many of the woman’s bones were eroded at the tips, and she would have stood just 140 centimetres (4 feet, 7 inches) tall.

— 5 months ago
Lead poisoning in ancient Rome →

Supply became contaminated as it passed through giant network of lead pipes that distributed water around city, scientists believe.

ap water in ancient Rome, provided by its famous aqueducts, was contaminated with up to 100 times more lead than local spring water, researchers say.

Huge volumes of fresh water flowed along aqueducts to the heart of the Roman empire but the supply was contaminated as it passed through the giant network of lead pipes that distributed water around the city.

Researchers in France said levels of lead in Roman drinking water were a concern, but were probably insufficient to cause widespread mental problems, or potentially drive up crime rates, through lead poisoning.

— 5 months ago with 1 note
Ancient Rome was bigger than previously thought →

British scientists have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the river port of ancient Rome which they say proves that the city was much larger than previously estimated.

Researchers from the universities of Southampton and Cambridge uncovered the extra section of the wall at Ostia while conducting a survey of an area between the port and another Roman port called Portus - both of which are about 30 miles from the Italian capital.

Scholars had thought the Tiber formed the northern edge of Ostia, but this new research, using geophysical survey techniques to examine the site, has shown that Ostia’s city wall continued on the other side of the river.

— 5 months ago
Roman Port Facilities Emerge Under Archaeological Investigation →

Known as Vada Volaterrana, it has been identified as a key port system located in present-day Tuscany, Italy, used anciently by the Romans of the city of Volaterrae (today’s Volterra) for the import and export of trade goods throughout the Mediterranean.

The main harbor was located north of the mouth of the Cecina river, at S. Gaetano di Vada. Here, the University of Pisa has been excavating, since the 1980s, a significant commercial quarter that has yielded major structures and numerous artifacts that have testified to a facility built during the Augustan age but lasting through to the sixth-seventh centuries, C.E.

Currently led by Simonetta Menchelli of the Laboratory of Ancient Topography of the University of Pisa and Stephano Genovesi of the Archaeological Superintendences of Tuscany, Liguria and Sardinia, the team has uncovered two thermal baths, a large warehouse (horreum) with about 36 cells, a large water tank, a monumental fountain, and a building with three large apses, decorated with remarkable wall paintings and surrounding an open squared courtyard.

— 5 months ago
Leicester dig unearths Iron Age mint and Roman tile with dog paw prints | Leicester Mercury →

Archaeologists believe they might have stumbled across an Iron Age mint which produced gold and silver coins for the coveted Hallaton Treasure.

The dig at Blackfriars, in the city, unearthed coin mould fragments which, combined with evidence from previous excavations, seems to confirm the site was a 2,000-year-old Corieltauvi tribe mint.

The Corieltauvi controlled most of the East Midlands, with Leicester as its capital.

Archaeologists believe the Blackfriars site could have produced some of the 5,000 silver and gold coins found in 2000, near the Leicestershire village of Hallaton.

Senior project manager Nick Daffern said: “We’ve got over 20 coin moulds, which at an urban site like this is quite significant – a lot of them would have been damaged over time.

"This is an exciting find and gives us an idea of where some of the Hallaton Treasure actually comes from."

The team also found a Roman tile in the northern half of the site, with what appear to be dog paw imprints embedded in the ceramic.

— 5 months ago
Roman Byzantine monastery and mosaic floor discovered →

An impressive monastery and mosaic dating to the Roman Byzantine period was discovered at the entrance to Hura in the northern Negev during the course of an IAA salvage excavation for the purpose of building a highway interchange.

The structure, measuring 20 × 35 meters, is divided into halls built along an east–west axis, the most outstanding of which are the prayer hall and dining room due to the breathtaking mosaic carpets revealed in them.

The prayer hall is paved with a mosaic on which a pattern of leaves is vibrantly portrayed in blue, red, yellow and green colors. The dining room floor is a colorful mosaic pavement depicting floral motifs, geometric decorations, amphorae, baskets and even a pair of birds.

According to Daniel Varga, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, “It seems that this monastery, located near the Byzantine settlement of Horbat Hur, is one monastery in a series of monasteries situated alongside a road that linked Transjordan with the Be’er Sheva‘ Valley”.

The mosaic carpets also include four Greek dedicatory inscriptions denoting the names of the monastery’s abbots: Eliyahu, Nonus, Solomon and Ilrion, and the dates when the pavements were constructed in the different halls. These inscriptions also aided archaeologists in dating the monastery to the second half of the sixth century CE.

— 5 months ago
Unearthing a Roman fort and settlement at Maryport →

An archaeological team is unearthing the remains of a Roman fort and settlement in the hope of gaining a better understanding of everyday Roman civilian life.

Oxford Archaeology (OA) and a team of volunteers are excavating an extramural settlement at Maryport Roman fort on the west coast of Cumbria.

Built high on the cliffs overlooking Solway Firth, it is believed the fort was founded in the First Century AD when the Roman army initially entered the region.

Now, a project is being undertaken to explore part of the fort’s civilian settlement to “build up a picture” of what ordinary life was like.

Believed to be founded before 120 AD during the reign of Emperor Hadrian, historians say the stone fort was an “integral part” in coastal defences extending down the Cumbrian coast from Hadrian’s Wall.

The civilian settlement, which lies north-east of the fort, is believed to be the largest currently known along the Hadrian’s Wall frontier.

— 5 months ago
Beachy Head Lady was young sub-Saharan Roman with good teeth →

“We had over 300 different individuals – most skeletons, but some cremations. The idea was to go back through all those. We had some information about some of them but others we had nothing on.

They were held in the basement of the town hall, where I keep my archaeology collection. They came primarily from two main Saxon cemeteries that were excavated – one in particular had over 200 graves.

During that process we came across two boxes which said ‘Beachy Head, something to do with 1956 or 1959’, and that was about it.

— 6 months ago